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Posts Tagged ‘book’

Since I ‘retired’ last year I seem to have been rather busy.  The good news is that, free from REF constraints, I can write what interests me not my employer! Here are links and references to recent publications (in reverse date order). Note: access to the P R Review article is free till August 13 through this link: https://authors.elsevier.com/c/1ZHOB1Ik9WUCdg

Journal article:

PRR

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pubrev.2019.05.002

Abstract:

A Global Capability Framework: Reframing public relations for a changing world.This paper describes a two-year research project the purpose of which was to produce the first globally applicable Capability Framework for the practitioner, employer and academic communities in public relations and communicationmanagement. Working with partners across seven continents and supported by the Global Alliance for Public Relations and Communication Management, a new approach to building capability was developed via to a four-stage research process, which resulted in nine country and one Global Capability Frameworks. The Global Capability Framework consists of 11 statements which taken as a whole, describe the scope and role of the profession.This paper explores the genesis of the project, a literature review, which also introduces the Capability Approach from the human development field, the research process which involved four different data collection methods, and the content of the resulting Global Capability Framework. The paper concludes with initial responses from the three communities for which the Framework is designed: practitioners, academics and employers. The paper combines theoretical innovation with a valuable practical contribution.

 

Book Chapter

Johanna Fawkes (2018). 15. Harm in Public Relations. In Patrick Lee Plaisance (Editor), Communication and Media Ethics (pp. 273–294). Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter. https://doi.org/10.1515/9783110466034-015

Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/9783110466034

Online ISBN: 9783110466034

 

Journal article

Fawkes, J. (2018 ). The evolution of public relations research – an overview.

Communication & Society, 31(4),159-171

doi: 10.15581/003.31.4.159

(PDF) The evolution of public relations research -an overview. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/329908323_The_evolution_of_public_relations_research_-an_overview [accessed Jul 11 2019].

Abstract:

The field of public relations is often misunderstood, due to its hybridity, complexity and competing perspectives within the field of scholarship. This essay, which is based on extensive engagement with literature conducted over decades of teaching and researching the subject, outlines the main schools of thought within the field. These are summarised as a) Excellence; b) Advocacy; c) Dialogue; and  d) Critical and Cultural approaches. Each perspective reflects variations in understanding of the role of public relations in theory and practice, ranging from an idealised conceptualisation of the practitioner to a demonised view of the practice. It refers throughout to different attitudes to ethics found within these schools, as approaches to ethics provide insight into understandings of the role of public relations within society. The piece concludes with reflections on the growing engagement with promotional culture and emerging research directions.

 

Also: forthcoming chapters (in print)

Public Relations and Professional Identity, in Valenti, C. Handbook of Public Relations, De Gruyter

Public relations and the performance of everything, in R. E. Brown, The Global Foundations of Public Relations: Humanism, China and the West. Routledge

The contribution of public relations to promotional culture – taking the long view, in  Somerville, I., Ihlen, O. and Edwards, L. (eds) Public Relations, Society and the Generative Power of History,  Routledge

Public Relations’ Professionalism and Ethics, Chapter 13, in Tench, R. and Waddington, S. (Eds) Exploring Public Relations (5th Ed), Pearson Education

 

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I’m starting a new blog to track the creation of my next book on appearance, deception, fast and slow communication. It’s provisionally titled Public Relations and Depth Communication: Behind the Mask (for the Routledge New Directions in Public Relations and Communications Research series). Will have thoughts, reviews, links. Followers, suggestions & contributions cordially invited here: Mask bookmask

  • with thanks to Padraig Macnamara for beautiful logo

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Reflecting on two days’ discussion of PR/Strat Comms as a research field, I observe a profound tension between

a) scholars who wish to constrain the research objects to something manageable, measurable and scientific which will help define the field for reserchers and enhance understanding of practice – theories which are observable in the material world. The strength of this desire is the search for core concepts/models through rigorous scientific method; the weakness is that it tries to put vagaries of human communication into boxes too small to contain them; and

b) scholars who embrace multi perspective/interdisciplinary approaches and consider pursuit of Truth as futile or phantastical – they have a more playful sense of research which undermines the foundational claims commonly made in PR/SC research. Their strength is the richness of ideas and imagination they bring to traditionally rather applied research; the weakness is that as perspectives multiply, the field itself could easily scatter beyond recognition or identification.

I belong to group b – with its roots in critical thinking and engagement with postmodern theory – but am aware that this has dangers.

My book proposal illustrates this: I presented ideas for a volume that combines social theory, PR theory, cultural studies, psychologies of persuasion, Jungian concepts and current PR practice. There is a central argument that weaves these strands together which, phew, was comprehensible to those present who gave the ideas a very warm welcome. So the weakness could be that the macro-level discussion of PR’s impact on society becomes too abstract; the strength lies in my experience of practice and ability to ground wilder theories in the everyday.

I greatly appreciated the opportunity to test these ideas and their relevance to the question of where PR research is going – it may have taken a lot of airmiles and a massive drop in Centigrade to get there, but I reckon one hour’s discussion has saved me 6 months’ solitary head banging. So, thanks to Howard Nothhaft and Sara von Platen from Lund University and Jens Seifert from U of Vienna for organising this event.fdf_ss24522

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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